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For general inquiries including collaborations, please contact senior program manager Tanyana Jackiewicz:

Phone: (08) 9340 3322
Fax: (08) 9489 7700
Email: tanyana.jackiewicz@health.wa.gov.au

Postal address

Children's Diabetes Centre
Telethon Kids Institute
PO Box 855
West Perth Western Australia 6872
Australia

Protein intake after exercise trial

Can protein intake after exercise decrease the risk of delayed low blood glucose levels after exercise?

Previous studies have shown that exercise in the late afternoon can increase the risk of low BGL not just straight after exercise but also during the night. The aim of this study is to find out if eating protein after exercise can help prevent low BGL later that night.

Visit 1: Meet the study team and collect some general information from you. We will ask you to complete a V̇O2 peak testing session, in which you will be asked to cycle on a stationary bike, increasing the intensity until you can no longer cycle. This is so that we can test your fitness level and set the intensity at the correct level when you come back for the testing sessions. This visit will take about 1 hour.

Visit 2-3: On each study day we will ask you to come to the research unit at 11am. You will have two drips put in, one to take blood and the other to give you glucose and insulin to target a normal BGL with normal insulin levels. You will be given sandwiches for lunch. The exercise session will start at approximately 4pm. This will involve cycling on a stationary exercise bike at 65 per cent of your maximum capacity for 45 minutes. Blood will be sampled at regular time points before, during and after exercise - this helps us to adjust the glucose drip to keep your BGL at target. We will also take blood samples for hormone levels throughout the study. You will not be able to eat after you have had lunch but you can have water. After exercise on one of the study days you will be given a protein drink in the evening and on the other study day you will not receive anything to eat but can still have water. We will keep your BGLs stable using the glucose drip and you will sleep overnight in the research unit. The study will finish at 6am and after this you will be given breakfast with your normal insulin and will then be able to go home.

If you are aged between 13 and 35 years old, weigh at least 42.9kg and your HbA1c is less than 9 per cent you may be eligible for this study. If you have complications of your diabetes, an injury or any other health conditions (other than Type 1 Diabetes), please advise us as you may not be able to participate in the study.

For more information or to take part, contact Joanne O'Dea on 9340 8742 or Joanne.O'Dea@health.wa.gov.au. More information can also be found here

Responses to exercise trial

The aim of this study is to see how similar your blood glucose response to exercise is on three separate occasions, when the conditions and intensity of exercise are the same.  If we find that the blood glucose response under the same conditions is similar and predictable, this will hopefully encourage more people with Type 1 Diabetes to participate in physical activity.

Visit 1: Meet the study team and complete a V̇O2 peak testing session in which you will be asked to cycle on a stationary bike, increasing the intensity until you can no longer cycle. This is so that we can test your fitness level and set the intensity at the correct level when you come back for the testing sessions. This visit will take about 1-1½ hours.

Visits 2-4: These are the exercise testing sessions.  Arrive at the research unit at 8am following an overnight fast. We will insert a drip in your arm so that we can take small blood samples throughout the study to test your BGL. Once your BGL is between 6 to 12mmol/L and stable, you will be asked to start exercising on a stationary bike for 40 minutes. Your blood glucose will be monitored during the entire exercise period and for one hour after exercise.

To be in the study you need to be between 15 and 25 years old, have had Type 1 Diabetes for more than 2 years, have a HbA1c less than 9 per cent and be on an insulin pump. If you have complications related to your diabetes please tell us as you may not be able to participate in the study.

For more information, contact Wayne Soon on 9340 7856 or Wayne.soon@health.wa.gov.au

 

Exercise intensity and carbohydrate trial

We know that the amount of carbohydrates to prevent hypoglycaemia differs with different intensities of exercise under basal insulin conditions in people with Type 1 Diabetes. We now want to see if this pattern is affected by higher insulin levels - similar to the effect of exercising soon after having bolused for food. The study involves people with Type 1 Diabetes aged between 15 to 30 years.  This is an in-clinic study and involves a fitness test and four testing sessions with exercise at different intensities for 40 minutes per session.

 

Above: Participants in some of our exercise trials. 

For more information, contact Vinutha B Shetty on 9340 7882 or Vinutha.shetty@health.wa.gov.au

Exercise performance in hyperglycaemia

The aim of this study is to find out if exercise performance in people with Type 1 Diabetes is affected by exercising with a high blood sugar compared to normal blood sugar levels.

For this study, participants will be asked to attend a familiarisation session and three testing days, where drips will be inserted – one for infusing insulin and glucose and another for regular blood sampling. For the testing days, a blood sugar of either 5 mmol/L or 17 mmol/L will be targeted with either a standard insulin rate or a low insulin rate for the two hyperglycaemic days. Once at the target condition, participants are asked to do a series of exercise tasks – short bike sprints, grip strength, balancing, jumping, reaction time and a cycle fitness test.

To be eligible for this study, participants need to be aged 14 to 26 years, have had Type 1 Diabetes for more than a year and be free from injury or other illness which would affect a person's ability to exercise.

For more information, contact Karen Rothacker at Karen.rothacker@health.wa.gov.au